Category Archives: Uncategorized

ADVICE TO ADOPTERS OF SHELTER OR RESCUE DOGS

Very often, when we adopt dogs from shelters or rescue organizations, we wind up feeling sorry for them. We spend much of our time trying to make up for all the bad times they may have experienced before they found us.  Please read the following advice and information as it is very important for us to set our new dogs up for success in their new homes.

  • Avoid pitying your newly rescued dog or he will become and remain pitiable forever!
  • Gradually introduce her to friends and family members within the first 2 days and continue socializing.
  • Dogs have no morals. They will not know proper behavior unless they’re taught how to behave appropriately in your home.
  • Begin training your dog in obedience and manners shortly after adopting.
  • Often there’s a honeymoon period lasting from 2 weeks to 6 months before the dog feels comfortable enough to be himself. Expect to see some changes in his behavior as time goes by and he becomes more confident that your home is his home.
  • Your dog may feel stressed for awhile. He may be pretty quiet reserved.
  • Assume that s/he may have housetraining accidents.
  • Crating a dog is not cruel. Dogs usually enjoy the feeling of being in a den. But rescues may not be able to accept crating.
  • Beginning on her 2nd day home, teach your dog to be alone for short periods of time, and then lengthen those periods a little each day. If you do not do this, you could create a dog who panics if he’s alone!
  • Avoid all physical and verbal punishment! Harsh punishment interrupts all learning & creates distrust.
  • If you discover your rescue has a serious issue, get professional help as soon as possible!
  • Never let your dog think that your hands are weapons OR chew toys!
  • Always acknowledge good behavior, either with treats, toys, praise or petting. That’s how he will learn what you expect from him.
  • Do not compare your new dog with any dogs you had previously! Dogs are not clones of one another.
  • Feed your dog twice a day and provide fresh water all day long.
  • Walk your dog twice a day, even if you have a fenced backyard. Walks provide both physical and mental stimulation. Allow her to sniff her new world.
  • Do not leave your dog out in the yard unsupervised, especially in the beginning.
  • Never leave your dog chained or tethered unless you are right with him!
  • Do not allow your dog to bark or chase people along your fence line. Bring him inside.
  • Have reasonable expectations. Dogs do not have human reasoning ability!
  • Do not spoil him by allowing him up on furniture or to sleep in your bed! This privilege can be given only after she learns how to behave politely through positive obedience training.
  • Teach your children to respect your dog. Do not let them pull tails or ears or sit on your dog.
  • Give your children a dog-free safety zone to play with their toys or run around.
  • Provide your dog with a kid-free safety zone to rest and/or enjoy a favorite chew toy.
  • Supervise your children and involve them, if possible, with your dog’s training.
  • If you have a baby, never allow ANY dog to be on the floor with your baby! Remember, dogs do not have morals. If baby grabs, pulls or throws a toy, your new rescue may not accept that!
  • Be patient with your newly adopted dog. Most times there is little or no known previous history about rescues. Set her up for success by training her and providing the necessary mental and physical exercise that ALL dogs need every day.

ON-LEASH REACTIVITY

Does your dog turn into Cujo as soon as he sees (1) another dog; (2) a white man or a black man; (3) a woman walking with a stroller;  someone riding a bike; or a jogger? Unfortunately, this is not a unique issue. We’ve discussed the importance of early socialization recently to prevent such behaviors, but what should a pet parent do when their dog is behaving this way? Should we yell at the dog? Should we do a leash correction or use a shock collar so the dog knows he’s being bad? Or, should we just tell the dog to “SIT!” until the stimulus that’s causing the reactivity goes away? NOOOooooo!

Keep in mind that reactivity is based in FEAR. When a dog is scared, he can make one of two choices: FIGHT or FLIGHT. That decision is based on the dog’s temperament. Without getting boringly technical, let’s just say the dog is having an adrenaline rush. If the dog looks like the one in the photo above, he probably can’t even hear you when you’re speaking to her. There are very good behavior modification protocols available to us to help make the dog feel better when faced with scary stimuli. But I want all of you to know that your default behavior should be to CREATE DISTANCE!

Purchase a well-fitted Freedom harness or a Gentle Leader head halter. Each of these can help you gain good control of your dog so you can make an “Emergency U-Turn” in order to get the heck outta Dodge. Check these items out at Amazon. Never ask your dog to sit when faced with fear. Help your dog and let him know you are the one who can protect him! Your dog needs to have that confidence in your ability to keep her safe and out of harm’s way.

Good luck!

 

 

 

Retired Racing Greyhounds

Renee and Karen talk to Michael McCann, President of The Greyhound Project. April is “National Greyhound Adoption Month.” Michael told our listeners about what it’s like to live with these wonderful and oftentimes shy dogs.  He describes them as “couch potatoes” and excellent dogs for older people to adopt.  If you are a low-energy type of person and you don’t want to be exercising your dog all day, consider adopting a Greyhound.  Click on this link if you want to learn more about adopting a greyhound.

Click here to play or download podcast