Fees/Services

Renee Premaza
Phone: 609-280-9338
Email: jerseydogtrainer@gmail.com

In-Home Private Obedience Training

I train in several locations in the South Jersey area, including Camden County, Gloucester County and Burlington County as well as Cumberland County. I frequently train in Hammonton and Mays Landing, Cherry Hill, Haddonfield, Voorhees, Marlton, Medford, Mt. Laurel, Moorestown, Sewell, Collingswood, Mullica Hill just to mention a few.

Fees for in-home training:

Please note if I have to pay any tolls to get to your home, I ask for those fees to be reimbursed.

training-classFEE #1: For basic obedience training of puppies up to 16 weeks of age, I charge $170.00/visit. Our first consult will be about 2 hours when we’ll discuss the importance of early socialization with people, places, new things, and other puppies and dogs. We’ll also discuss proper house-training methods, crate training, and how to deal with that oh-so-annoying puppy play-biting. If you have young children, we’ll talk a lot about how the children should safely and appropriately interact with your puppy. For subsequent training sessions, I will work with you and your puppy for 1-1/2 hours. Puppy kindergarten is a great way to socialize your young puppies with other puppies. I recommend only one facility located in W. Berlin, NJ: WONDERDOGS

FEE #2: For all dogs over 16 weeks of age, I charge a minimum of $190.00/visit. I am experienced in working with dog-human aggressiveness, dog-dog aggressiveness, leash reactivity, separation anxiety, shyness and fearfulness toward humans and/or other dogs, resource guarding, etc. Our first consult will be about 2 hours. All subsequent training visits will be 1-1/2 hours.

FEE #3:: Sign up during our first consult for a package of 4 visits (which includes the first one) and receive a discount off the entire package total. This is non-refundable and must be paid in full before I leave your home at the first visit.

Please be aware that there is NO quick fix to rehabilitate a dog that has been biting or showing threatening behaviors! Your dog needs to go through behavior modification training. You also need to learn how to work with him/her to gain your dog’s trust in your relationship. This takes time, patience and commitment from all family members. The harder you work with your dog, the more improvements you can achieve in most cases.

Payment is due at the time of our appointment; I accept checks and cash — sorry, no credit cards. Also, there are no refunds given once training begins.

A Word About Puppies:

The best time to contact a professional trainer is when you’re just looking for that special puppy or older dog. I would be happy to help you select that right companion dog for your particular life-style.

To prevent having behavioral problems develop in the first place, avoid getting your puppy during the winter months. You will have a difficult time house-training your pup to go outside due to bad-weather days and nights. You will also have a much more difficult time getting the puppy out for walks and socialization, both of which are hugely important for all puppies! Avoid giving a new puppy as a gift unless that recipient is with you to select the puppy. Make sure you research the breed that you are thinking about getting, as well as the breeder! Your puppy’s breed will determine some of his future behaviors. If you’re shopping for a puppy, be sure to meet and interact with the puppy’s mom and dad. Afterall, they are the basis that forms your puppy’s genetic makeup. Even if you see a puppy that you fall madly in love with, think {Red Flag !} IF: the breeder won’t allow you to meet the parents, you see any unfriendliness from either of the parents, or you notice that the puppy you are most attracted to… is not so attracted to you!

Avoid bringing your puppy home before s/he is 8 weeks old! Dogs need to be with their moms and littermates at least until then in order to learn important things, like dog to dog social skills and bite inhibition! Puppies who are taken from their litter before 8 weeks will play-bite using a lot harder pressure than puppies brought home at 8 weeks. They may also be lacking in dog-dog social skills! If a breeder seems too anxious to release the puppies before then, that is another {Red Flag !} that the breeder just wants to get rid of the pups and get paid.

Make sure you’re going to be able to get your puppy out for frequent potty breaks. Crating puppies for long periods of time is very counterproductive and can actually cause significant behavior problems to develop. Make sure you have the time to exercise your new puppy, get the kids off to school, go to work, and still be able to meet your puppy’s basic needs. Puppies are a lot of work! You will need to devote time for your new puppy if you want to avoid house-training accidents, chewing and other destructive behaviors. One more bit of absolutely free advice: make sure to teach your puppy how to be alone! From day 2, begin leaving puppy in the crate alone for 10 minutes, then 20 minutes while slowly building up to longer periods of time each day. Rule of thumb for leaving dogs alone in the crate go something like this: At 2 months, leave pup alone for no longer than 1 hour (after doing some “alone” training); at 3 months, leave pup alone for 2 hours, at 4 months, leave pup alone for 3 hours, and so that’s how it goes. I can’t tell you how many dogs develop severe separation anxiety because owners neglect to teach the dog to be alone when they’re very young puppies.

When you get your new puppy or you adopt a new adult dog, do not make the mistake of spoiling him. All too often, we rescue dogs that have had unfortunate past lives and we feel that we have to make it up to them by giving him everything they want. Spoiling a dog will not show him you love him and it will not make up for all that went wrong in his life before he came to you! By spoiling him, you will only be telling him that you’re weak and can’t implement rules. Dogs absolutely need to know there are rules to follow. If you give your puppies or dogs everything they want, they will become obnoxious and demanding! Avoid allowing your dogs to get up on furniture or to sleep in your bed or your children’s beds without getting permission. Avoid giving your puppies and dogs treats just because they’re cute! Also, avoid mindlessly petting your dogs. Use treats and petting as a reward because they’ve offered appropriate behaviors that you like.

How Do You Know When Your Dog Needs Training?

All puppies and dogs need at least basic training in manners and self-control. An untrained dog is like an untrained child. As with our children, dogs must learn that there are rules to follow in their lives in order to live successfully with us in a domestic environment. Your dog needs to learn that you are his trusted guide and teacher, you control all the good and necessary resources in his life, and you make all of the critical decisions that affect his safety and well-being.

If your dog won’t listen to you, train him to pay attention! If your dog won’t come when called, train him to come to you! If your dog pulls you when you walk, train him to walk on a loose leash! He will not figure out how to perform good behaviors unless and until you teach him!

If you train your dog at a very early age (you can begin training puppies at 8 weeks), your dog will be much less inclined to develop major behavior problems throughout its life. If you neglect early training, you may experience some of the following problems with any breed at any age:

  • Jumping on guests and children
  • Digging holes in your yard
  • Stealing things just to get your attention
  • Excessive barking both in the home and outside
  • Pushy and demanding behaviors
  • Nipping and mouthiness
  • Rude behavior with other dogs
  • Anxious and fear-related behaviors
  • Dog can become out of control
  • Food and object possessiveness
  • Pulling on leash
  • Will not come when called
  • Inattentiveness to you
  • Dog to dog aggressiveness
  • Dog to human aggressiveness

Treat Your Dog Like a Human and He’ll Treat You Like a Dog!